8 Best Desktop Bitcoin Wallets Available for Download ...

5 Best Cryptocurrency Wallets with User-Owned Private Keys

5 Best Cryptocurrency Wallets with User-Owned Private Keys

https://preview.redd.it/sycppf5jrhk31.png?width=1000&format=png&auto=webp&s=f4e3415322fb12f29319fbd8c22fa90d14ffebbb
All cryptocurrency transactions are based on the control of two important numbers: public and private keys. Public keys facilitate the transfer of crypto; private keys, their receipt. These keys are stored and secured through digital wallets, the software through which users have access to their digital assets.
There are two main models of cryptocurrency wallets: those that don’t allow users to control their private keys and those that do. The first model of wallets host users’ private keys on a centralized server, which facilitates transactions. In the second model, users hold their own private keys and are able to send and receive tokens without the consent of a third party.
So just how important is it to directly control your private keys? We’ll answer that question today, and review some of the best wallet options that allow you to do that.

Private keys: What they are and why they matter

Private keys are randomly generated secret numbers that link a user to particular cryptocurrency assets. Coins can be transferred to other blockchains only by accessing a wallet’s private keys. For this reason, it is extremely important to keep private keys secure and confidential. Matt Miller, a Bloomberg TV host, demonstrated this lesson to the world when he briefly showed his private key QR code on-air and had his funds immediately stolen.
In one model of wallet, a third-party retains control of the private keys. This model is typically described as the crypto version of a bank. The user is the owner of the funds but relies on the wallet’s server to execute transactions. However, this comparison fails to recognize key dangers inherent in third-party management of crypto funds.
Crypto wallets, like bank accounts and any other internet-connected account, are at risk of being hacked. Unlike banks, however, crypto projects are not legally obligated to refund account holders their funds in the case of a security breach. For this reason, keeping funds in a wallet for which you don’t control the private keys is significantly riskier than storing fiat currency in a bank.
User-owned private key wallets offer a much stronger option in terms of security. No one has control over your funds except you. That means that if someone hacks the server hosting your wallet, your funds are secure. It also means that you can’t have your funds stolen if the wallet’s leadership “loses” the private keys (yes, that has happened).
Always remember that private keys unlock full access to digital funds. Opting for wallets with user-owned private keys ensures that you maintain control over your funds and do not rely on a third party to make transactions. Here, we picked out some of the most trusted solutions that allow full user-control over private keys.

Coin Wallet

Coin Wallet is an excellent solution that allows you to directly conduct blockchain transactions and access tokens. You can export your private keys, and the wallet does not have access or oversight over your operations within the software.
Coin Wallet is suited to the needs of both beginners and professional crypto users. It comes as free software with simple and streamlined interfaces in both mobile and desktop versions. The wallet supports any ERC20 and ERC223 tokens, including Bitcoin, Litecoin, Dogecoin, Bitcoin Cash, EOS, Ripple, Stellar, and Ethereum.
Of all the wallets on the market, Coin Wallet offers one of the most exhaustive collections of coins. Currently, there are more than 20,000 supported cryptocurrencies. The app gets bonus points for convenience, providing two built-in exchanges: Changelly and ShapeShift.

Blockchain

In 2011, Blockchain wallet pioneered the niche of online wallets. It remains one of the market leaders in wallets offering user-controlled keys. Currently, the company has over 41M wallets and more than $200B in transactions have been made on it since its start.
The mobile app is available in multiple languages and offers a built-in exchange for fast trading. Interfaces are very easy to follow and intuitive. The major drawback of this veteran wallet is that it supports just 5 coins: Bitcoin (BTC), Ether (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH), Stellar (XLM), and USD PAX (PAX).

Exodus

Exodus comes as a download for desktop or mobile. In addition to giving you control of your private keys, it also allows you to export them, as well. Plus, as an extra security measure, it never stores private keys on the server.
This wallet may not suit the needs of all users, as there is no web version and English is the only supported language.
The app lists 100+ crypto coins and offers ShapeShift as a built-in exchange.

Armory

Armory wallet is a great choice for users who want a simple storage option for their crypto assets. It offers some offline functionality, as well as free cold storage. It also lets you back up private keys (a QR code) on paper or create a multi-signature wallet. The latter option is particularly useful for businesses.
A major drawback of this wallet is that it is the least user-friendly option. Users need to have some basic knowledge encryption and software set-up. In addition, sending digital assets with Armory is less convenient than competitors and it doesn’t offer any built-in exchanges.

Bitcoin Core

Launched by the Bitcoin project, Bitcoin Core has a simple interface and is compatible with Mac, Linux, and Windows. It allows users to check the full node of Bitcoin transactions, i.e. download the entire blockchain. Therefore, it might take some time to download the full blockchain and set up your wallet.
A drawback of Bitcoin Core is that it’s large: you must have at least 200GB free disk space for this software, and system requirements constantly increase as the full Bitcoin network node grows.
As its name suggests, Bitcoin Core supports only Bitcoin. If you plan on trading and using only Bitcoin, this wallet is a great choice. Because you keep the full node on your computer, you don’t need any third parties to verify transactions. Sending or receiving coins here is very simple, and you are directly connected to the full Bitcoin network node. The fees are decided on by user votes.
submitted by GTE_IO to u/GTE_IO [link] [comments]

Trezor-T as offline computer for cold storage sweep process

Dear Trezor Team and community!
I have a good idea as i think. I wrote to support of Trezor but they rejected my idea. But i think the bitcoin community will glad to have this feature:
For example i have a bitcoin paper wallet. This wallet was generated in offline computer from bitaddress.org site for example. I put there bitcoins. And i would like to "sweep" bitcoins from there. What can i do? Now i have only few some ways. I can use Electrum online computer, Mycelium (and other) mobile wallets and etc. But if there many bitcoins? I can use some offline Electrum computer (importing private key and signing) + online Electrum computer (watching and making a transaction). Or Armory program. But it's not easy even for advanced user! These programs is very hard installing to offline computer.
I would like to suggest for Trezor T feature: "Trezor T" could allow to enter through "Trezor T" touch screen any private key of any cold storage and to sign transaction from computer. So "Trezor T" works here exactly as offline computer for signing! I think it could be fine to have same feature. Because sweeping from cold storage very very dangerous operation from security. In sweeping process we should trust to computer fully.
So brief scheme:
1) wallet.trezor.io has a feature: sweep from cold storage, for example
2) We click there "sweep" and enter address where to send from cold storage
3) The Trezor T ask to enter private key through touch screen
4) We enter (yes, it can take a long time, for example 1-3 minutes), the trezor checks and if private key is valid the trezor calculates bitcoin address from there sweep and sends to computer. As well it shows the bitcoin address where we will send bitcoins. We check and accept.
5) a computer sees in blockchain all UTXO outputs and makes transaction and sends it to Trezor
6) Trezor shows us BTC amount and the bitcoin address where we will send (which was got from computer in step 2)
So we have here: safe way to sweep, safe way to see BTC amount and where to send. All these data are checked by TRezor T microcomputer. We trust our Trezor so we trust this transaction and provate key of cold storage is secured.
What do you think?
submitted by Perlover to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet Feature of the Week & news

Hi everybody! I'm going to start doing weekly posts, showcasing one Mycelium feature I find interesting, and updating on what's going on with our team and development. We have tons of awesome stuff being worked on!
So, without further ado, this is the feature that first got me into Mycelium (and impressed the heck out of me at the San Jose conference):
Spending from cold/paper wallet
  1. Take out printout of private key
  2. In Mycelium, go to the Menu is the top right corner (three vertical dots)
  3. Select Cold Storage
  4. Press QR Code, and scan the private key of your paper wallet. This loads the private key into your phone's secure memory, but does not save it to your storage.
  5. Proceed to spend as normal, entering the Bitcoin address from either the QR code or clipboard, and entering the amount. Note - Mycelium will retrieve the balance of your paper wallet and will show that once you click the Enter Amount keyboard button (I asked the guys if they could make the balance a bit more prominent).
  6. Hit send, and Mycelium Wallet will broadcast your transaction, send all the remaining change back to the paper wallet, and wipe the private key from your phone's memory.
This is a pretty great way to spend money from secure cold storage, without relying on a separate computer (as in Armory/Electrum) or a hardware wallet device (Trezzor). It's not as secure as offline signing, but it's much better than a wallet kept on your computer. When Jan first demoed this for me, he whipped out a private key on a folded business card stored in his pocket, spent money from it, and stuck it back into his pocket, with his phone posing no risk to his bitcoins.
EDIT: This includes support for BIP38 encrypted paper wallets, so if you keep your key in that form, even if someone steals it, i won't be spendable. More here http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1xc5lw/mycelium_bitcoin_wallet_feature_of_the_week_news/cfa67fy
In the news, the Mycelium team is traveling to the Inside Bitcoins conference in Berlin (but I won't be). While there, they will be unveiling a rather exciting and important new service that will be built right into the Mycelium Wallet. I regret not being able to go, because this new thing of theirs is really awesome, is related to a bunch of recent news, is very important for bitcoin's ecosystem and may help speed up adoption immensely, and I would have been promoting the hell out of it even if I wasn't a part of the team. So if you are going to the conference, make sure to find the Mycelium guys and pester them with questions! I won't be paid unless you pin them against a wall and ask them all about it :( And if you can't make it to the conference (It's €445!!!), don't fret. I'll still fill you in on the whole thing right here. I can't wait!
submitted by Rassah to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The World Wide Web runs on webservers in datacenters. The World Wide Blockchain should also run on "blockservers" in datacenters. The "sweet spot" of Bitcoin scaling, reliability, security & convenience is *nodes in the cloud* + *private keys offline*. The is the future of Bitcoin. Let's embrace it.

Four-Line Summary
(1) Bitcoin nodes (and everyone's public addresses) should be online - in datacenters.
(2) Bitcoin wallets (and your private keys) should be offline - in your pocket.
(3) This architecture provides the optimal combination or "sweet spot" for short-term and long-term Bitcoin scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
(4) The best communications strategy is for us to embrace the approach of "nodes-in-datacenters" a/k/a "blockservers-in-the-cloud" - instead of apologizing for it.
Longer Summary
(1) Bitcoin nodes should be online - on "online public blockservers", ideally running on big, powerful webservers with high connectivity & high-end specs, in datacenters.
(2) Bitcoin private keys should be offline - in "offline private wallets", ideally running on tiny, cheap computers with no connectivity & low-end specs, in your pocket.
https://blockchainbdgpzk.onion/pushtx
(3) We should embrace "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") and "keys-in-your-pocket" as the future of Bitcoin, providing the optimal combination (or "sweet spot") of scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
Details
Bitcoin has been a success for 7 years and is continuing to grow and needs a simple and safe way to scale.
So, now it is time for people to embrace nodes-in-datacenters a/k/a blockservers-in-the-cloud (plus private keys offline - to enable 100% security with "offline signing of transactions") as Bitcoin's future.
Why?
(1) ...because everything on the web actually works this way already - providing the optimal combination of scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
  • You already keep your passwords for websites and webmail on you - usually physically offline (in your head, written on a slip of paper, or maybe in an offline file, etc.)
  • When was the last time you ran a server out of your home to continually spider and index terabytes of data for the entire web?
  • Why should you need to hold 60 GB of data (and growing) when you just want to check the balance of a single Bitcoin address (eg, one of your addresses)?
  • Bitcoin is still very young, and if in order to fulfill its earlier promise about banking the unbanked, microtransactions, DACs (decentralized autonomous corporations), IoT (Internet of Things), smart contracts, etc., then we should hope and expect that the blockchain will someday take up terabytes, not "mere" gigabytes - just like Google's giant search engine index, which they update every few minutes.
  • Do you really think you should be performing this kind of heavy-duty indexing, querying and "serving" on a low-end machine behind a low-end connection in your home, when companies like Google can do it so much better?
  • As long as you physically control your own private keys, who cares if you rely on blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com (or someday: bitcoin.google.com or bitcoin.msn.com or bitcoin.yahoo.com) to lookup up public information about balances and transactions on Bitcoin addresses?
  • They're not going to be able to lie to you. The meaning of "permissionless" and "decentralized" is that anybody can set up a full-node / "blockserver" (plus "blockchain search engines"), and anybody can (and will) immediately report it to the whole world if a website like blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com (or someday: bitcoin.google.com or bitcoin.msn.com or bitcoin.yahoo.com) provides false information - which would seriously damage their business, so they'll never do it.
(2) ...because webservers and webmail don't lie to you, and "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") aren't going to be able to lie to you either - since it would not be in their interest, and they would get caught if they did.
  • When was the last time google.com or or yahoo.com or msn.com (bing.com) lied to you when you performed a search or looked up some news?
  • When was the last time blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com lied to you when you checked the balance at a Bitcoin address?
  • Currently, with billions of websites and news sources ("webservers") running around the world in datacenters, there are "web search engines" (eg, google.com or news.google.com or msn.com or yahoo.com) where you can look up information and news on the World Wide Web. In order to survive, the business model of these "web search engines" is about getting lots of visitors, and providing you with reliable information. It's not in their best interests to lie - so they never do. These sites simply "spider" / "crawl" / "index" the entire massive web out there (every few minutes actually), and then conveniently filter / aggregate / present the results as a free service to you.
  • In the future, when there are 10,000 or 100,000 Bitcoin full-nodes ("blockservers") running around the world in datacenters, there will be "blockchain search engines" (eg, bitcoin.google.com or bitcoin.msn.com or bitcoin.yahoo.com - just like we already have blockchain.info and blockexplorer.com, etc.) where you will be able to lookup transactions and balances on the World Wide Blockchain. In order to survive, their business model will be about getting lots of visitors, and providing you with reliable information. It's not going to be in their best interests to lie - so they never will. These sites will simply "spider" / "crawl" / "index" the entire massive blockchain out there (every few minutes actually), and then conveniently filter / aggregate / present the results as a free service to you.
  • The business model for "blockchain search engines" might eventually showing ads or sponsored content along with the Bitcoin blockchain search functions which we are primarily interested in. This would be quite usable and simple and safe, and similar to how most people already use sites like google.com, yahoo.com, msn.com, etc.
(3) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide simple scaling now.
  • Nodes-in-the-cloud are the only solution which can provide scaling now - using existing, tested software - by simply adjusting - or totally eliminating - the MAXBLOCKSIZE parameter.
  • They can use existing, tested, reliable software: thousands of 2MB+ nodes are already running.
  • About 1,000 Classic nodes have been spun up in AWS ECS datacenters (Amazon Web Services - Elastic Computer Cloud) in the past month. (Uninformed yes-men at r\bitcoin try to spin this as a "bad thing" - but we should embrace it as a "good thing", explicitly espousing the philosophy outlined in this post.)
  • "Nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") can be flexibly and easily configured to provide all the scaling needed in terms of:
    • Bandwidth (throughput)
    • Hard drive space (storage)
    • RAM (memory)
    • CPU (processing power)
  • The yes-men and sycophants and authoritarians and know-nothings on the censored subreddit r\bitcoin are forever fantasizing about some Rube Goldberg vaporware with a catchy name "Lightning Network" which doesn't even exist, and which (at best, if it ever does come into existence) would be doomed to be slow, centralized and expensive. LN is a non-thing.
  • Those same people on the censored r\bitcoin forum are desperately trying to interpret the thousands of Classic nodes as a negative thing - and their beloved non-existent Lightning Network as a positive thing. This is the kind of typical down-is-up, black-is-white thinking that always happens in a censorship bubble - because the so-called Lightning Network isn't even a thing - while Classic is a reality.
(4) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide more reliability / availability.
  • 24/7/365 tech support,
  • automatic server reboots,
  • server uptime guarantees,
  • electrical power uptime guarantees.
(5) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide better security.
(6) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide more convenience.
(7) ...because separating "full-node" functionality from "wallet" functionality by implementing "hierarchical deterministic (HD)" wallets is cleaner, safer and more user-friendly.
Armory, BIP 0032 provide "hierarchical deterministic (HD)" wallets.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/BIP_0032
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Deterministic_Wallet
http://www.bitcoinarmory.com/tutorials/armory-advanced-features/offline-wallets/
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/How_to_set_up_a_secure_offline_savings_wallet
http://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/16646/offline-wallets-electrum-vs-armory
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQumISxkJsQ
  • "Hierarchical deterministic" wallets are required in order to be able to keep private keys offline, and "offline-sign" transactions. This is because a wallet needs to be "deterministic" in order to be able to generate the same sequence of random private keys in the offline wallet and the online wallet.
  • "Hierarchical deterministic (HD)" wallets are also required in order to allow a user to perform a single, one-time, permanent backup of their wallet - which lasts forever (since a HD wallet already deterministically "knows" the exact sequence of all the private keys which it will generate, now and in the future - unlike the antiquated wallet in Core / Blockstream's insecure, non-user-friendly Bitcoin implementation, which pre-generates keys non-deterministically in batches of 100 - so old backups of Core / Blockstream wallets could actually be missing later-generated private keys, rendering those backups useless).
  • Bitcoin is now over 7 years old, but Core / Blockstream has mysteriously failed to provide this simple, essential feature of HD wallets - while several other Bitcoin implementations have already provided this.
  • This feature is extremely simple, because it is all done entirely offline - not networking, no game theory, no non-deterministic behavior, no concurrency. The "HD wallet" functionality just needs some very basic, standard crypto and random-number libraries to generate a "seed" which determines the entire sequence of all the private keys which the wallet can generate.
  • Newer Bitcoin implementations (unlike Core / Blockstream) have now "modularized" their code, also separating "full-node" functionality from "wallet" functionality at the source code level:
  • in Golang - "btcsuite" from Conformal, providing "btcd" (node) and "btcwallet" (wallet):
  • in Haskell + MySQL/SQLite - "Haskoin":
  • There is also a Bitcoin implementation which provides only a full-node:
  • in Ruby + Postgres - "Toshi" from CoinBase:
  • [Tinfoil] The fact that Core / Blockstream has failed to provide HD and failed to clean up and modularize its messy spaghetti code - and the fact that Armory is now out of business (and both companies received millions of dollars in venture capital, and the lead dev of Armory left because the investors were creating needless obstacles regarding intellectual property rights, licensing, etc.) - these facts are suspicious because suggest that these corporations may be trying to discourage dev-friendliness, user-friendliness, security, convenience, and on-chain scaling.
(8) ...because the only thing most users really want and need is total physical control over their private keys.
  • Most people do not want or need to run a Bitcoin full-node, because:
    • A Bitcon full-node consumes lots of disk space and bandwidth, and can be expensive and complicated to set up, run, maintain, and secure.
    • A Bitcoin full-node requires an extremely high level of hardware and software security - which most computer users have never even attempted.
  • As Armory or Electrum users know, the simplest and safest way to provide 100% guaranteed security is by using "offline storage" or "cold storage" or "air gap".
  • In other words, ideally, you should never even let your private keys touch a device which has (or had) the hardware and/or software to go online - ie: no Wi-Fi, no 3G, and no Ethernet cable.
  • This offline machine is used only to generate private keys (where a Bitcoin private key is literally actually just any truly random number up to around 1078 ) - and also used to "offline-sign" transactions.
  • So it is simplest and safest if your private keys are on an offline machine which never can / did go online - and such as machine can be very cheap, because it really only needs to run some very basic random-number-generator and crypto libraries.
  • It would be simplest and safest for people to own a tiny cheap 100% secure offline computer to use only for:
    • generating / storing Bitcoin private keys
    • signing Bitcoin transactions
    • possibly also for generating / storing other kinds of private keys (other cryptocurrencies, GPG keys, etc.)
Four-Line Summary / Conclusion:
(1) Bitcoin nodes (and everyone's public addresses) should be online - in datacenters.
(2) Bitcoin wallets (and your private keys) should be offline - in your pocket.
(3) This architecture provides the optimal combination or "sweet spot" for short-term and long-term Bitcoin scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
(4) The best communications strategy is for us to embrace the approach of "nodes-in-datacenters" a/k/a "blockservers-in-the-cloud" - instead of apologizing for it.
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Anyone manage to get Armory working?

I've been trying to get Bitcoin Armory to work. It seems I have a very common problem with the software. 'Initializing Bitcoin Engine' for eternity.
I've done usual 'google it' but those solutions seem to have no effect on armory itself.
For a short while, Bitcoin Core largely had the same issue, by running the 'qt' executable and waiting about an hour; Core is working just fine, and starts up with no issues.
Meanwhile Bitcoin Armory just 'initializes' I do realize I could just use Core, but Armory seemed like it would be pretty damn nice if it actually worked.
And after reading on how wallets work and private keys, etc. I decided the best combo would be a local software-based 'hot/active' wallet and I've got a trezor and trezor steel on the way to cold storage/recovery
Other than running Testnet/qt, is anyone aware of other solutions that worked? My next step is a reinstall.
I don't currently have any wallets or whatnot to worry about. I just spent the past few weeks reading about Bitcoin so I'd actually have an understanding of what I was doing.
I also tried to register over at Bitcoin Talk but their captcha system is broken (shows the same image, but the puzzle is actually different) but that's their issue to resolve.
Anyway, hope you're all having a good day. This cryptocurrency stuff seems pretty cool and I'm looking forward to hopping onto the train.
submitted by Alpha17x to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cannot sweep into Electrum or Armory

I have been having a lot of trouble over the past few days with something I thought would be simple—sending 0.1 as a test to a paper wallet and ensuring I could sweep these funds back into my wallet before sending some bitcoin to a fresh paper wallet for cold storage.
I had numerous problems sending the funds, but a transaction finally went through for 0.1 yesterday. Now, with 75 confirmations, neither Armory or Electrum can find any funds for this address when attempting to sweep. Here is the address: 1HswqbS6swTMarPh6QwQme9QmBA12cwoMp
I have tried 4 or 5 times with Armory and a couple with Electrum. I had previously tried to sweep the funds into Armory from this address before the transaction was confirmed. Could this cause the problem? How can I get my funds back?
TLDR: Cannot sweep funds with Electrum or Armory that I know are there.
Edit: Just now, I tried entering the compressed private key (starting with an L) instead of the entering the uncompressed key (starting with a 5) and my funds showed up. I thought private and private compressed were essentially the same, and these are the keys bitaddress is showing when I decrypt my BIP-38 key.
submitted by ddIbb to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Need help with Armory

I re-installed Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit on my computer and when I installed Bitcoin Core and Armory and restored my wallets, Armory is now reporting an incorrect balance.
I'm running Bitcoin Core v0.10.0 and Armory v0.93.1. Before the format, I was running one of the previous versions of Core and Armory v0.92.3. Armory only had a watching wallet for cold storage. I simply transferred my wallet.dat file and my *_.watchonly.wallet from my AppData folder. I've tried the rescan and rebuild option on Armory to no avail. Why is it still showing me a balance that is short? I can see the correct amount showing on the address on the blockchain.
Any help or advice that can be offered would be much appreciated.
submitted by kodiferous to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Paper Wallet not creating usable info

So I am new and have recently installed Bitcoin-QT and Armory. I have gotten everything connected to the network and working in full node. I simply create a wallet and encrypt, and prepare to make a paper backup. Once I press the button to create the backup, it either does nothing or eventually shows me the screen that would have the information needed but it is just blank and tells me never to show anyone this info basically nothing. Anyone have this issue or have any tips how I can figure this out? I am deff a noob to the full node scene. Trying to work my way into cold storage.
submitted by Schrocklobster to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Having trouble sending funds

Yesterday, I made a post after having a transaction fail to be accepted into the blockchain. This morning, I attempted the transaction again to the same address—this time with a fee. This is also still unconfirmed now for over 12 hours.
Here is the address I am attempting to fund: 1HswqbS6swTMarPh6QwQme9QmBA12cwoMp
Some factors I think could be affecting this:
I see transactions on blockchain coming in with 0.0001, 0.00014, 0.0000518, etc. Why are these being accepted but mine are not? I have successfully sent some transactions in the past but never had this sort of trouble when including fees similar to what I have included recently. Can someone recommend some next steps to get back on track? I really just want to fund a paper wallet to keep some BTC in cold storage.
TLDR: I keep trying to send bitcoins to an address, but my transactions are not even being accepted anymore—even when including what I think are sufficient fees.
edit: make more legible
submitted by ddIbb to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet Feature of the Week & news

Hi everybody! I'm going to start doing weekly posts, showcasing one Mycelium feature I find interesting, and updating on what's going on with our team and development. We have tons of awesome stuff being worked on!
So, without further ado, this is the feature that first got me into Mycelium (and impressed the heck out of me at the San Jose conference):
Spending from cold/paper wallet
  1. Take out printout of private key
  2. In Mycelium, go to the Menu is the top right corner (three vertical dots)
  3. Select Cold Storage
  4. Press QR Code, and scan the private key of your paper wallet. This loads the private key into your phone's secure memory, but does not save it to your storage.
  5. Proceed to spend as normal, entering the Bitcoin address from either the QR code or clipboard, and entering the amount. Note - Mycelium will retrieve the balance of your paper wallet and will show that once you click the Enter Amount keyboard button (I asked the guys if they could make the balance a bit more prominent).
  6. Hit send, and Mycelium Wallet will broadcast your transaction, send all the remaining change back to the paper wallet, and wipe the private key from your phone's memory.
This is a pretty great way to spend money from secure cold storage, without relying on a separate computer (as in Armory/Electrum) or a hardware wallet device (Trezzor). It's not as secure as offline signing, but it's much better than a wallet kept on your computer. When Jan first demoed this for me, he whipped out a private key on a folded business card stored in his pocket, spent money from it, and stuck it back into his pocket, with his phone posing no risk to his bitcoins.
EDIT: This includes support for BIP38 encrypted paper wallets, so if you keep your key in that form, even if someone steals it, i won't be spendable.
In the news, the Mycelium team is traveling to the Inside Bitcoins conference in Berlin (but I won't be). While there, they will be unveiling a rather exciting and important new service that will be built right into the Mycelium Wallet. I regret not being able to go, because this new thing of theirs is really awesome, is related to a bunch of recent news, is very important for bitcoin's ecosystem and may help speed up adoption immensely, and I would have been promoting the hell out of it even if I wasn't a part of the team. So if you are going to the conference, make sure to find the Mycelium guys and pester them with questions! I won't be paid unless you pin them against a wall and ask them all about it :( And if you can't make it to the conference (It's €445!!!), don't fret. I'll still fill you in on the whole thing right here. I can't wait!
submitted by Rassah to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

Offline Wallet Bitcoin Cold Storage Part 2: Building a Cold Storage Netbook with Electrum Setting up cold storage in Armory on Ubuntu 14.04 Bitcoin Cold Storage Part 3: Using the System Installing Bitcoin Armory

Armory is an open-source bitcoin wallet with multi-signature and cold storage supporting features. Armory Bitcoin wallet lets you set up multiple wallet addresses that enable you to separate business holdings from the personal bitcoin account. Dive in to know more about the wallet. Digital money that’s instant, private, and free from bank fees. Download our official wallet app and start using Bitcoin today. Read news, start mining, and buy BTC or BCH. Armory is an open source bitcoin wallet providing cold storage and multi-signature support for the slightly more advanced cryptocurrency community. If you’ve ever heard of cold storage, then you probably know a thing or two about Armory. Before the Armory wallet, cold storage was mostly a theoretical subject that had very few real-world applications. The development of cold storage ... Armory is another Bitcoin-only wallet developed by an experienced team of developers and is a open-source software. It is a heavy wallet, meaning one needs to download the full blockchain and set-up a full node to use the Armory wallet. But it has many benefits too, for example, you need not trust any other listening nodes and can self-verify many things by yourself. One can also create cold ... A better bitcoin backup metal plate! Single plate design, 12 words per side. Quality steel cut and etched in Canada 🇨🇦. Etch marks chemically colored in black for better legibility. Designed to be small in size, only 5x3" (12.7x7.62cm) for better storage and concealment. Tough 2mm thick steel. Check out the picture gallery. Buy SEEDPLATE

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Offline Wallet

Bitcoin 101 - Getting Your BTCs out of Your Paper Wallets & Cold Storage - Fun with Sloppy Wallets - Duration: 10:54. CRI 81,557 views How to set up a cold storage (a.k.a. offline wallet) in Armory on Ubuntu 14.04. You will see: - How to install Armory on an offline computer. - How to set up... In part 2 we set up a Bitcoin cold storage system using an inexpensive netbook, Lubuntu (a Linux distro for low-end hardware) and popular Bitcoin wallet software Electrum. How to install Armory 0.93 and Bitcoin Core 0.10 on Windows 7, and how to create your first wallet. A guide for beginners. Enable subtitles in the video. If you like the guide, feel free to send a ... In part 2 we built a cold storage system with an inexpensive netbook. In part 3 we learn how to use it. We'll step through an entire transaction as well as point out a few more security tips.

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